11.9.01

Archive for April 22nd, 2009|Daily archive page

Obama’s National Intelligence Director Says Now Banned Interrogation Techniques Yielded Good Intelligence

In Civil Liberties, Torture on April 22, 2009 at 9:30 am

According to the New York Times:

President Obama’s national intelligence director told colleagues in a private memo last week that the harsh interrogation techniques banned by the White House did produce significant information that helped the nation in its struggle with terrorists.  “High value information came from interrogations in which those methods were used and provided a deeper understanding of the al Qa’ida organization that was attacking this country,” Adm. Dennis C. Blair, the intelligence director, wrote in a memo to his staff last Thursday.

“I like to think I would not have approved those methods in the past,” he wrote, “but I do not fault those who made the decisions at that time, and I will absolutely defend those who carried out the interrogations within the orders they were given.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Donald Rumsfeld Approved SERE Interrogation Techniques for Military Use Against Terror Suspects

In Torture on April 22, 2009 at 9:24 am

A recently declassified report shows that the harsh interrogation techniques included in SERE were approved by former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld for use by military personnel in the interrogation of suspects in the War On Terror:

The report focused solely on interrogations carried out by the military, not those conducted by the Central Intelligence Agency at its secret prisons overseas. It rejected claims by former Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and others that Pentagon policies played no role in harsh treatment of prisoners at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq or other military facilities.

The 232-page report, the product of an 18-month inquiry, was approved on Nov. 20 by the Senate Armed Services Committee, but has since been under Pentagon review for declassification. Some of the findings were made public in a Dec. 12 article in The New York Times; a spokesman for Mr. Rumsfeld dismissed the report at the time as “unfounded allegations against those who have served our nation.”

The Senate report documented how some of the techniques used by the military at prisons in Afghanistan and at the naval base in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, as well as in Iraq — stripping detainees, placing them in “stress positions” or depriving them of sleep — originated in a military program known as Survival Evasion Resistance and Escape, or SERE, intended to train American troops to resist abusive enemy interrogations.

Read the rest of this entry »